Tools

GENERAL INTRODUCTION

studies, beyond being mentioned in general works on Roman oratory, on Roman history and politics, or on the texts in which they appear (brief comments on many ofthem, though, are offered in Bardon 1952). The more famous orators, such as Cn. Pompeius Magnus (111), L.Sergius Catilina (112), C. Iulius Caesar (121), and M.Antonius triumvir (159), have been the focus of much modern scholarship, and some recent works are listed in the introductions to each of them.

Malcovati’s notes in her edition (not specifically quoted here) provide further information on the historical context of each orator and each speech (and have been gratefully used, with some updates and clarifications). For particularly important or controversial matters, articles on questions of detail are quoted at the appropriate points; a fullrecord of all secondary literature discussing various (mainly historical) problems relating to each item has not been attempted.

xxxvi

ABBREVIATIONS AND SYMBOLS

ABBREVIATIONS AND SYMBOLS

NUMBERING AND REFERENCING
  • number in bold (e.g., 1): sequential number of an orator in FRL and Malcovati
  • number + lowercase letter in bold (e.g., 58b): sequential number of an orator in FRL and Malcovati, added in Malcovati’s later editions
  • number + capital letter in bold (e.g., 19A): sequential number of an orator in FRL, added to those covered in Malcovati
  • T + number in bold (e.g., T 1): general testimonium on life and/or works of an orator
  • F + number in bold (e.g., F 4): “fragment” of an utterance of an orator
  • F + number + lowercase letter in bold (e.g., F 1b): “fragment” of an utterance of an orator, added in Malcovati’s later editions
  • F + number + capital letter in bold (e.g., F 2A): “fragment” of an utterance of an orator in FRL, added to those covered in Malcovati
  • number in bold + T/F + number (e.g., 25 T 5 or 58 F 4
xxxvii