Hippocrates, Diseases of Women 1–2

LCL 538: x-xi

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GENERAL INTRODUCTION

glossator Erotian lists Γυναικείων α′ β′ in the “therapy by regimen” section of his census of Hippocratic writingsand includes over fifty words from each book in his Glossary, referring explicitly to α′ Γυναικείων five times.4 Pliny the Elder adopts in his Natural History5 many prescriptions drawn from both books, and Soranus of Ephesus in his Gynecology attributes views expressed in Diseases of Women to Hippocrates and his followers (οἱ περὶ τὸν Ἱπποκράτην).6 Galen of Pergamum refers in his Glossary seven times to πρῶτον τῶν Γυναικείων and twelve times to δεύτερον τῶν Γυναικείων, while providing glosses for over fifty lemmata from each of the treatises; he also makes reference to two passages in Diseases of

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GENERAL INTRODUCTION

Women I in his commentary on the Hippocratic Aphorisms. In the fifth century Hesychius of Alexandria glosses about twenty-five terms originating directly or indirectly from each of the treatises, while the sixth-century Byzantine medical compiler Aëtius of Amida takes over one prescription from Diseases of Women I.7

Diseases of Women III also appear to have been a part of the medical curriculum in Alexandria in the sixth century: Stephen of Athens (the Philosopher) quotes from them four times in his commentary on the Aphorisms, and he refers to them as the Γυναικεῖα both there and in his commentary on Prognostic; John of Alexandria refers to the Γυναικεῖα in his commentary on the Nature of the Child; and the contemporary Aristotle commentator John Philoponus locates a term he is discussing in the Γυναικεῖα of Hippocrates.

Two early Latin manuscripts, St. Petersburg F. v. VI. 3 (VIII/IX c.) and Parisinus Latinus 11219 (IX c.), contain gynecological compendia that incorporate textual material translated from the Greek text of Diseases of Women III. Because some of these translations display similarities in language and technique with extant Latin translations of Oribasius’ medical texts often assumed to have been made in the neighborhood of Ravenna in the sixth century, scholars have proposed the same place and date of origin for the Diseases of Women translations.8 Closest to the Greek text is the Latin De conceptu (De mulierum affectibus according to Vázquez Buján), whose thirty-three

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