Aristotle, Art of Rhetoric

LCL 193: 480-481

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  • σχῆμα: (2.24.2; 3.8.1) “form,” “figure” of a speech. It does not correspond to the modern expression “figure of speech,” but is an “attitude” or “turn of meaning given to the language when it comes to be actually spoken” . . . “a difference of sense resulting from a difference of some kind in the mode of enunciation” (Bywater, Poetics 19.7).
  • τάξις: (3.13–19) the arrangement or distribution of the parts of a speech.
  • ταπεινὴ λέξις: (3.2.1) “low,” “poor,” “mean”; in a moral sense, “base,” “vile” (ταπεινότης, 2.6.10).
  • τεκμήριον (1.2.16, 1.2.17). See σημεῖον.
  • τέχνη: (1.1.3) set of rules, “handbook” of rhetoric: elsewhere of the “tricks” of rhetoricians; τεχνολογεῖν (1.1.9), to bring under the rules of art, reduce to a system.
  • τόπος: (2.26.1) literally, a “place to look” for a store of something, and the store itself; a heading or department, containing a number of rhetorical arguments of the same kind (τόπος εἰς ὂ πολλὰ ἐνθυμήματα ἐμπίπτει). These are all classified and placed where they can be easily found ready for use. τόποι are of two kinds: (1) κοινοὶ τόποι (commonplaces) or simply τόποι, the topics common to the three kinds of rhetoric (1.2.21; 2.18.3–5); (2) εἴδη or ἴδια (1.2.21), specific topics, propositions of limited applicability, chiefly derived from ethics and politics.
  • ὑπόκρισις: (3.1.3) “delivery” of a speech, under which declamation, gesticulation, expression, and everything connected with acting are included; ὑποκριτικὴ λέξις (3.12.2), “style suited for delivery,” “lending itself to acting”; [τέχνη] (3.1.7), “the art of acting.”
  • χώρα: (3.17.15) “room” for our own arguments as well as those of the adversary in the hearer’s mind, to get a footing for what we are going to say; (2.24.2) the proper place, province.
  • ψιλός: (3.2.3) “bare,” “bald,” of prose as opposed to poetry.
  • ψυχρός: (3.3.1) “cold,” “frigid,” “insipid.” As a noun, τὸ ψυχρόν means generally any defect of style as opposed to ἀρετὴ λέξεως.
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INDEX OF NAMES

INDEX OF NAMES

  • Achilles, 1.3.6; 2.22.12, 2.24.6; 3.17.11
  • Aegina, 3.10.7; Aeginetans, 2.22.7
  • Aenesidemus, 1.12.30
  • Aeschines (Socraticus), 3.16.10
  • Aesion, 3.10.7
  • Aesop, 2.20.5, 2.20.6
  • Aesopian (fables), 2.20.2
  • Agathon, 2.19.13, 2.24.10
  • Agesipolis, 2.23.12
  • Ajax (tragedy), 2.23.20, 2.23.24
  • Alcaeus, 1.9.20
  • Alcibiades (descendants), 2.15.3
  • Alcidamas, 1.13.2; 2.23.11; 3.3.1, 3.3.2, 3.3.4
  • Alcinous, 3.16.7
  • Alcmaeon (tragedy), 2.23.3
  • Alexander (Paris), 2.23.12; 3.14.3
  • Alexander (oration), 2.23.8, 2.24.7
  • Alphesiboea, 2.23.3
  • Amasis, 2.8.12
  • Amphiaraus, 2.12.6
  • Anaxagoras, 2.23.11
  • Anaxandrides, 3.10.7, 3.11.8, 3.12.3
  • Androcles, 2.23.22
  • Androtion, 3.4.3
  • Antigone, 3.16.9
  • Antimachus, 3.6.7
  • Antiphon, 2.2.19, 2.6.27, 2.23.20
  • Antisthenes, 3.4.3
  • Archelaus, 2.23.8
  • Archibius, 1.15.15
  • Archidamus, 3.4.3
  • Archilochus, 2.23.11; 3.17.16
  • Archytas, 3.11.5
  • Areopagus, 1.1.5; 2.23.12
  • Ares, 3.4.4, 3.11.11
  • Argos (Argives), 1.14.4
  • Aristides, 3.14.3
  • Aristippus, 2.28.12
  • Aristogiton, 1.9.38; 2.24.5
  • Aristophanes, 3.2.15
  • Aristophon, 2.23.7
  • Athenians, 1.15.13; 2.22.5, 2.23.11; 3.10.7, 3.14.11
  • Athens, 2.23.11
  • Athos, 3.9.7
  • Attic: neighbor, 2.21.12; orators, 3.11.16; phiditia, 3.10.7
  • Autocles, 2.23.12
  • Babylonians (comedy), 3.2.15
  • Bias, 2.13.4
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