Tools
  • in the Augustan literary world: 9.2.9, 24, 34; 9.3.13; 9.4.76, 132; 10.1.22, 24, 113; 10.2.17, 25
  • Asprenas, C. Nonius, defended on a poisoning charge by Pollio, prosecuted by Cassius Severus: 10.1.22
  • Athens, Athenians: 9.2.92; 10.1.66, 76
  • Atreus, son of Pelops, king of Mycenae: 9.3.57
  • “Attic” writers, stylists etc.: 9.4.145; 10.1.65, 80, 100, 107, 115; 10.2.17
  • Aufidia, litigant in a case defended by Servius Sulpicius: 10.1.22
  • Aufidius Bassus, historian: 10.1.103
  • Aulis, scene of the gathering of the Greek army for the expedition against Troy: 9.2.39
  • Bibaculus, M. Furius, Roman poet: 10.1.96
  • Brutus, M. Junius (c.85–42 bc), one of the murderers of Julius Caesar, friend of Cicero and addressee of his Orator: 9.1.41; 9.3.86, 95; 9.4.41, 63, 75–76; 10.1.23, 123; 10.5.20; 10.7.27
  • Caecilius, Q., person who unsuccessfully claimed (against Cicero) the right to prosecute Verres: 9.2.59
  • Caecilius (of Caleacte), rhetorician and literary critic of late Republican/Augustan times; his work “On Sublimity” was answered by “Longinus”: 9.1.12; 9.3.38, 46, 89, 91, 98
  • Caecilius Statius, Roman comic poet, fl. 180–170 bc: 10.1.99
  • Caecina, A., defended by Cicero, 69 bc: 9.3.22, 80
  • Caelius Rufus, M. (82–48 bc), friend and correspondent of Cicero, who defended him in Pro Caelio: 9.3.58; 10.1.115; 10.2.25
  • Caesar (1) C. Julius (100–44 bc), “the dictator”: 9.2.28; 9.3.61; 10.1.38, 114; 10.2.25; (2) C. Julius Caesar Strabo Vopiscus, orator, character in De oratore: 9.1.28
  • Caesar = Augustus: 9.3.24; Caesar = Domitian: 10.1.92
  • Caesius Bassus (first century ad), lyric poet: 10.1.96
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  • Calidius, M., praetor 57 bc: 10.1.23
  • Callimachus, of Cyrene, poet and scholar, fl. 280–245 bc: 10.1.58
  • Calvus, C. Licinius (82–47 bc), poet and “Atticist” orator, friend of Catullus: 9.2.25; 9.3.56; 10.1.15; 10.2.25
  • Camilli, a family distinguished in fourth century bc, including the dictator M. Furius Camillus, who captured Veii and was regarded as the “second founder” of Rome after the Gallic invasion of 390 bc: 9.3.24
  • Carbo, C. Papinius, probably the consul of 129 bc: 10.7.27
  • Carthaginians: 9.3.31
  • Cartorius Proculus (?), rhetor or grammarian: 9.1.2
  • Cassius Severus, orator of Augustan period, often regarded as initiating decadence of style: 10.1.22, 116
  • Catiline (L. Sergius Catilina), leader of the “conspiracy” which Cicero, as consul, suppressed in 63 bc: 9.2.7, 32; 9.3.19, 45, 62
  • Catius Insuber (d. 45 bc), Epicurean philosopher, known to Cicero: 10.1.124
  • Cato (1) M. Porcius (234–149 bc), consul 195, censor 184, statesman, orator, historian: 9.2.21; 9.4.39; (2) M. Porcius (95–46 bc), republican politician and Stoic philosopher; committed suicide at Utica after defeat by Caesar’s forces: 9.2.25; 9.4.75; 10.5.13
  • Catullus, C. Valerius (c.84–c.54 bc), poet: 10.1.96; quoted: 9.3.16; 9.4.141
  • Celsus: see Cornelius Celsus
  • Cestius Pius, L., rhetor: 10.5.20
  • Chaeronea, town in Boeotia, scene of Philip’s victory over the Greeks 338 bc: 9.2.62
  • “Chalcidic verse,” with reference to Euphorion: 10.1.56
  • Charisius (c.300 bc), Attic orator: 10.1.70
  • Cicero: see Tullius
  • Cinna, C. Helvius, poet, friend of Catullus: 10.4.4
  • Cleomenes of Syracuse, put in charge of Roman fleet by Verres: 9.3.43
  • Clitarchus of Alexandria, historian of Alexander: 10.1.74
  • Cloatilla, defended by Domitius Afer: 9.2.20; 9.3.66; 9.4.31
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