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Index of Proper Names

  • Accius, L. (170–86 bc), tragic poet and scholar: 10.1.97
  • Achilles, son of Peleus and Thetis, the hero whose “wrath” is the subject of the Iliad: 10.1.47, 50, 65
  • Aebutius, Sex., prosecutor of A. Caecina in 69 bc: 9.3.22
  • Aelius Stilo, L. (born at Lanuvium c.150 bc), scholar: 10.1.99
  • Aeschines (d. c.322 bc) Attic orator, Demosthenes’ chief rival; retired to Rhodes and taught rhetoric there: 10.1.22, 77
  • Aeschylus (c.525–456 bc), Athenian tragic poet: 10.1.66
  • Aetolians, people of N.W. Greece: 10.1.49
  • Afranius, L. (second century bc), author of comedies with Roman settings (togatae): 10.1.100
  • Africa: 9.4.73
  • Africanus: see Scipio
  • Agamemnon, king of Mycenae and leader of Greeks at Troy: 9.3.57
  • Alba Longa, Latin city said to have been founded by Aeneas’ son Ascanius: 9.2.38; 9.3.26
  • Alcaeus (seventh-sixth century bc), lyric poet at Mytilene: 10.1.63
  • Ammon, Egyptian god conceived as a man, identified with Jupiter: 9.3.48
  • Amyclae, ancient settlement near Sparta: Amyclaeus = Spartan, and the famous Spartan hounds can be called “Amyclaean”: 9.3.51
  • Anacreontic colon: see on 9.4.78
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  • Ancharius, person involved in the case of Cicero’s client Varenus: 9.2.56
  • Angitia, goddess worshipped near Fucine Lake in Italy: 9.3.34
  • Antimachus of Colophon (c.400 bc), epic and elegiac poet: 10.1.53
  • Antipater of Sidon (c. 150–105 bc), epigrammatist, spent his last years at Rome: 10.7.19
  • Antonius (Hybrida), C., son of the orator M. Antonius, consul (with Cicero) in 63 bc, accused by M. Caelius in 59 bc of extortion and of participation in the Catilinarian conspiracy; defended by Cicero: 9.3.58, 94
  • Antonius, M., “Mark Antony” (83–31 bc), the “triumvir” and opponent of Octavian: 9.3.61, 86
  • Apollodorus of Pergamum, rhetor, teacher of Augustus; a rigorous and restrictive theorist, rival of Theodorus of Gadara: 9.1.12
  • Apollonius of Drepanum, a victim of Verres’ peculations: 9.2.52
  • Apollonius of Rhodes, author of the epic Argonautica, written c.250 bc: 10.1.54
  • Appius Claudius Pulcher, consul 54 bc, correspondent of Cicero, accuser of Milo: 9.3.31
  • Aratus of Soli (c.315–c.240 bc), didactic poet, author of Phaenomena: 10.1.46, 55
  • Archilochus of Paros, iambic and elegiac poet: 10.1.59
  • Argives, Argos: 9.4.140
  • Aristarchus of Samothrace (c.216–144 bc), scholar and head of the Alexandrian library: 10.1.54, 59
  • Aristophanes (d. 386 bc), Athenian comic poet: 10.1.66
  • Aristophanes of Byzantium, scholar, head of the Alexandrian library from c.194 bc: 10.1.54
  • Aristotle (384–322 bc), of Stagira, philosopher: 10.1.83; Rhetoric quoted: 9.4.87–88
  • Asia, Asians: 9.3.43; 9.4.103
  • Asinius Pollio, C. (76 bc-ad 4), consul 40 bc; an important figure
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