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Index

  • Academy (the Platonic School of philosophy), pp. xxiiif; ii, 2; v, 1
  • Academy, the Old (i.e. before Arcesilas’s headship), ii, 34; iv, 5; v, 7
  • Academy, the New (i.e. from Arcesilas onwards), ii, 43; v, 7, 76n
  • Adiaphoron, iii, 53
  • Aeschines (Athenian orator), v, 5
  • Afranius (writer of Roman historical tragedies, b. c. 150 b.c.), i, 7
  • Africanus; see Scipio
  • Agelastos, v, 92
  • Agesilaus (King of Sparta 398–360 b.c., panegyrized in Xenophon’s Agesilaus), ii, 116
  • Albucius, Titus, i, 8
  • Alexander the Great (King of Macedon, 336–323 b.c.), ii, 116
  • Animals created for man, iii, 67; pleasure and pain not sole motives of, ii, 109; in captivity, v, 56
  • Antiochus (restorer of the “Old” Academy, d. 68 b.c.), p. xxiv; v, 1,8ff, 14, 75, 81
  • Antipater (head of Stoic School c. 44 b.c.), i, 6
  • Apeiria, i, 21
  • Apoproēgmena, p. xxi; iii 15, 51
  • Appetitio, prima, appetitus pr.; see Prima naturae
  • Arcesilas (founder of Second or New Academy; c. 315–240 b.c.), p. xxiii; ii, 2; v, 87
  • Archilochus (Greek lyric poet, c. 720–676 b.c.), ii, 115
  • Archimedes (of Syracuse, most famous of ancient mathematicians, b. 287 b.c.), v, 50
  • Archytas (of Tarentum, philosopher and mathematician, fl. 400 b.c.), ii, 45; v, 87
  • Arion (Pythagorean philosopher), v, 87
  • Aristides (Athenian general and statesman, called “The Just,” d. c. 470 b.c.), ii, 116
  • Aristippus (hedonistic philosopher of Cyrene, b. c. 428 b.c.), p. xvi; i, 22; ii, 18ff, 34f, 39, 41; v, 20
  • Aristo (of Ceos, head of Peripatetic School, c. 224 b.c.). v, 13
  • Aristo (of Chios, a heterodox Stoic, fl., c. 260 b.c.). ii, 35, 43; iii, 11, 50 iv. 40, 43, 47, 49, 60, 68f.v. 23. 73.
  • Aristophanes (of Byzantium, scholar, b. c. 260 b.c., head of Alexandrian library, editor of Homer, Plato, etc.), v, 50
  • Aristotle (384–322 b.c.), p. vii; i, 6, 7; ii, 17, 19, 34, 40, 106; iii, 10; iv, 3; v, 7, 11f, 73; style, i, 14. See Peripatetics
  • Aristoxenus (of Tarentum, pupil of Aristotle, philosopher and musician, fl. 320 b.c.), v, 50
  • Aristus (philosopher of “Old” Academy, brother of Antiochus), v, 8
  • Athambia, v, 87
  • Athens, philosophical and literary associations of, v, 2ff
  • Athos, Mount (promontory of Macedonia; traces of Xerxes’ canal still visible), ii, 112
  • Atilius (Roman dramatist c. 200 b.c.), i, 5
  • Atoms, i, 17ff
  • Atticus, Titus Pomponius (friend and correspondent of Cicero), i, 16; ii, 67; v, 1, 3, 96; origin of surname, v, 4
  • Attius, (Roman tragic poet, b. 170 b.c.), ii, 94; iv, 68; v, 32
  • Aufidius, Gnaeus (Roman statesman and historian, praetor 103 b.c.), v, 54
  • Axia; see Value
  • Barbati, iv, 62
  • Blammata, iii, 69
  • Brutus, Lucius Junius (consul 509 b.c.), ii, 66
  • Brutus, Marcus Junius (the tyrannicide), i, 1; iii, 1; v, 1, 8
  • Brutus, Marcus Junius (jurisconsult, father of the preceding), i, 12
  • Caecilius Statius (Roman writer of comedies c. 200 b.c.), i, 4; ii, 13; 14, 22
  • Caepio, Gnaeus (consul), ii, 54
  • Caepio (half-brother of Cato), iii, 8
  • Calatinus, A. Atilius (cos. 258 and 254 b.c. during first Punic War; buried
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